Indie News

Weinstein Company Pulls ‘War With Grandpa’, ‘The Upside’ & ‘Mary Magdalene’ Off Release Schedule

Weinstein Company Pulls ‘War With Grandpa’, ‘The Upside’ & ‘Mary Magdalene’ Off Release Schedule
While the Weinstein Company deals with a few internal matters, it has pulled three Dimension films from their 2018 release dates. Robert De Niro-Christopher Walken starrer The War with Grandpa had been set for February 23, Bryan Cranston-Kevin Hart comedy The Upside gives up its March 9 date, and biblical biopic Mary Magdalene starring Rooney Mara has exited the March 30 slot.

War with Grandpa and The Upside were set for wide release, and Mary Magdalene had been slated…
See full article at Deadline »

‘Won’t You Be My Neighbor?’ Review: Kind Man’s Story Carries Powerful Message in Unkind Times

‘Won’t You Be My Neighbor?’ Review: Kind Man’s Story Carries Powerful Message in Unkind Times
If conflict is at the heart of most documentaries, how do you make a film about the nicest, kindest, least conflict-ridden person in the history of television? More specifically, how do you make a doc about Mister Rogers? That was the task that faced Morgan Neville, who won an Oscar for “20 Feet From Stardom,” his film about the struggles faced by a group of backup singers. He was last at Sundance with “Best of Enemies,” a gripping doc about a series of epic (and vicious) debates between William Buckley Jr. and Gore Vidal. Fred Rogers, the subject of Neville’s new...
See full article at The Wrap »

‘Monsters and Men’ Review: A Compelling Study of Racial Turmoil to Fit Our Confused Times — Sundance 2018

‘Monsters and Men’ Review: A Compelling Study of Racial Turmoil to Fit Our Confused Times — Sundance 2018
Reinaldo Marcus Green’s drama “Monsters and Men” rips from the headlines while going beyond them, following the aftermath of police shooting an unarmed black man from several different perspectives. Green, who makes his directorial debut with this feature after a substantial filmography of shorts, has essentially applied that same skill here. Though at times its message-oriented plot veers toward the obvious, Green’s measured screenplay manages to ask big questions without overstating them. The triptych of stories don’t overlap in obvious ways, and so Green’s quietly effective drama functions less as a linear narrative than a three-point meditation on African American identity at a moment of profound confusion.

It starts, as these stories so often do, with a viral video: Young family man Manny (Anthony Ramos) is hanging out with his peers
See full article at Indiewire »

‘The Guilty’: Single Location, Real-Time Thriller Crackles With Tension [Sundance Review]

‘The Guilty’: Single Location, Real-Time Thriller Crackles With Tension [Sundance Review]
This debut from Gustav Möller begins with an extreme close-up on a headset, as we hear frantic audio being received by emergency dispatcher Asger Holm (Jakob Cedergren). “The Guilty” soon zooms out, but it never goes very far. The tense Danish thriller is set exclusively in two adjoining rooms of the dispatch station; all the action happens off screen, over the phone in real time, as Asger desperately tries to help the woman on the other end.

Continue reading ‘The Guilty’: Single Location, Real-Time Thriller Crackles With Tension [Sundance Review] at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

GLAAD Media Awards: The Complete List of Nominees

GLAAD Media Awards: The Complete List of Nominees
As the nominations for the 29th annual GLAAD Media Awards were announced today, Battle of the Sexes, Call Me by Your Name, Lady Bird, Professor Marston and the Wonder Women. and The Shape of Water all scored nominations for Outstanding Film in Wide Release.

Claiming noms for Outstanding Film-Limited Release were BPM, A Fantastic Woman, God's Own Country, Thelma and The Wound.

In all, 125 nominees were announced in 21 English-language categories and another 16 in four Spanish-language categories.

Actress Trace Lysette (Transparent) and actor Wilson Cruz (Star Trek: Discovery) announced the nominees live on GLAAD's Facebook page from Park City,...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Tamara Jenkins Delivers Infertility Dramedy ‘Private Life’ for Sundance Opening Night

Tamara Jenkins Delivers Infertility Dramedy ‘Private Life’ for Sundance Opening Night
Director Tamara Jenkins has always been interested in the family dynamic. The indie classic “Slums of Beverly Hills” was about failed upward mobility in the late 1970s. “The Savages” was about disinterested siblings who need to solve the problem of an ailing father.

After a ten-year break, Jenkins returned to open the 2018 Sundance Film Festival on Thursday night with “Private Life,” about a reproductively-challenged couple who need to start a family before they eviscerate the two-person unit they’ve already got.

Kathryn Hahn plays Rachel, a 41-year-old novelist who...
See full article at The Wrap »

Mark Burnett and Nick Emerson on Editing Aubrey Plaza Comedy An Evening with Beverly Luff Lin

Writer/director Jim Hosking premiered his short Renegades at Sundance in 2010 and returned to the festival in 2016 with his debut feature The Greasy Strangler. His second feature, An Evening with Beverly Luff Lin, premieres in the Next program at Sundance 2018. Luff Lin unites Hosking with a cast of comedy luminaries: Aubrey Plaza, Jemaine Clement and Craig Robinson, among others. The film was edited by Mark Burnett, who also edited Greasy Strangler, and Nick Emerson (Lady Macbeth, Starred Up). Filmmaker spoke with the film’s editing team about the film’s tricky tone, which teeters between absurdist and romantic comedy, ahead of Luff Lin‘s premiere […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

Joaquin Phoenix In ‘Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get Far on Foot’ [Sundance Review]

Park City – After screening Gus Van Sant’s new film “Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get Far on Foot” at the 2018 Sundance Film Festival I came to the not so fresh realization that we may all be taking Joaquin Phoenix for granted. Sure, he gives strange interviews (when he speaks at all) and makes strange career mistakes now and then (such as Woody Allen’s “Irrational Man” for the creative reasons alone), but since 2012’s “The Master” he has basically delivered one acting master class after another.

Continue reading Joaquin Phoenix In ‘Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get Far on Foot’ [Sundance Review] at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Review: Don't Worry About the Media—Steven Spielberg's "The Post"

As Steven Spielberg's The Post glides effortlessly into Oscar season as a film that's Timely with a capital T, two recent quotes from the director merit consideration. The first comes from an interview with the Hollywood Reporter, where Spielberg said, of the film's urgency, "I thought this was an idea that felt more like 2017 than 1971. I could not believe the similarities between today and what happened with the Nixon administration...I realized this was the only year to make this film." Indeed, 2017 was so much the year for the film—about the leaking of the Pentagon Papers on the Vietnam War, the Washington Post's role in publishing them, and the Supreme Court battle that followed—that Spielberg shuffled his schedule to push The Post quickly into production. The second quote comes from the film's premiere, when a reporter approached Spielberg on camera and asked what he thought of Donald Trump as President.
See full article at MUBI »

‘American Animals’ Review: A True Heist Story About Four Idiot Kids Who Fowled Up — Sundance 2018

‘American Animals’ Review: A True Heist Story About Four Idiot Kids Who Fowled Up — Sundance 2018
“You’ve seen too many movies.” It’s a line that’s almost as old as the movies themselves. And yet, in reality, very few people have actually seen too many movies (and most of those people are film critics). More often than not, the trouble is that someone hasn’t seen enough movies. Case in point: Bart Layton’s “American Animals.”

Had the film-loving twentysomethings at the heart of this real-life heist story bothered to watch the “Rififi” DVD they rent from their local Blockbuster, perhaps they would have known how these stories usually end (though a deep knowledge of “Reservoir Dogs” doesn’t seem to faze them). Had any of them taken the time to revisit “Fight Club” (because there’s no way these kids haven’t seen “Fight Club”), perhaps they wouldn’t have needed to throw their lives away in order to make peace with the
See full article at Indiewire »

Chloe Sevigny On the Totally Unexpected ‘Carnal’ Nude Scene in Her Lizzie Borden Drama — Sundance 2018

Chloe Sevigny On the Totally Unexpected ‘Carnal’ Nude Scene in Her Lizzie Borden Drama — Sundance 2018
Some spoilers for “Lizzie” ahead.

Leave it to Chloe Sevigny and her long-time passion project “Lizzie” to unleash the first truly jaw-dropping scene of Sundance 2018. In Craig William Macneill’s take on the 1892 murders of Abby and Andrew Borden, long believed to be at the hand of Andrew’s daughter Lizzie (Sevigny), the infamous American criminal (she wasn’t ever convicted, but the court of public opinion is another matter) gets the chance to redraw her own history and motivations.

While Macneill’s film, which premiered at the Library theater on Friday night at Sundance, opens with the murders already completed in seriously bloody fashion, it then flashes back to the six months leading up to the horrific deaths. By the time Andrew and Abby bite it, Macneill and Sevigny, aided by Bryce Kass’ script, have made a strong case for why Lizzie did what she (might have) done, motivated
See full article at Indiewire »

‘High Maintenance’ Season 2 Review: Don’t Be Clouded By the Smoke Surrounding TV’s Most Human Show

  • Indiewire
‘High Maintenance’ Season 2 Review: Don’t Be Clouded By the Smoke Surrounding TV’s Most Human Show
[Editor’s note: Spoilers for “High Maintenance” Season 2, Episode 1, “Globo” follow.]

Near the beginning of “High Maintenance’s” fifth episode of Season 2, “Scromple,” a very unconventional preacher’s sermon includes the phrase “praise the miracle and the mess.” It’s an ethos which does a nice job of summing up the ways in which the HBO series embraces humanity’s best and worst impulses, our flaws and our screw-ups and our moments of grace, and an attitude which coming into 2018 brings with it almost a sense of healing.

Continuing to track the lives of New Yorkers struggling to get by on every level, the show never feels like it’s running away from its central premise, following a bike-riding pot dealer (known as the Guy, played by co-creator Ben Sinclair) servicing Manhattan and the greater New York area. But it has continued to evolve and grow with time, letting each episode build upon the last
See full article at Indiewire »

Fellini's Fancy: Close-Up on "The White Sheik" and "Nights of Cabiria"

Close-Up is a feature that spotlights films now playing on Mubi. Federico Fellini's The White Sheik (1952) is showing January 20 - February 19, 2018 and Nights of Cabiria (1957) from January 21 - February 20, 2018 on Mubi in the United States. Even the most straight-faced Federico Fellini film veers toward the illusory. From the lackadaisical daydreams of wayward young men to the ingenuousness of a simple-minded woman wanting nothing more than to be loved in a world that is anything but loving, his characters regularly search for something so perceptibly near and so conceivably real, yet something often revealed to be deceptive at best, nonexistent at worst. And when he applies this tendency with extravagant conviction, enhancing the whimsy further toward the fantastic, the result is something for which an adjective had to be created: “Felliniesque.” Variety Lights (1950), the first film Fellini directed—in collaboration with Alberto Lattuada—revolved around the world of vaudeville, so
See full article at MUBI »

“One of the Most Chaotic and Stunning Moments of My Life”: Director Jeremiah Zagar | We the Animals

As you made your film during the increasingly chaotic backdrop of the last year, how did you as a filmmaker control, ignore, give in to or, conversely, perhaps creatively exploit the wild and unpredictable? What roles did chaos and order play in your films? My wife became pregnant just before I left for the Sundance Directors Lab and I knew even then that I wanted the birth of our child to be part of the movie. On March 12, 2015 at the crack of dawn her water broke. That morning Jeremy Yaches and Christina King (my producers) dropped a camera […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

“The Big Cameras Get Stopped in Security”: Alexandria Bombach on Shooting and Directing On Her Shoulders

Documentary filmmaker Alexandria Bombach released her debut feature, Frame by Frame, in 2015 to major acclaim on the festival circuit. The film screened at more than 30 festivals, including Swsx, Hot Docs, AFI Docs and the Camden International Film Festival, where it won the award for Best Documentary Feature. Bombach debuts her second feature, On Her Shoulders, in the U.S. Documentary Competition lineup at Sundance 2018. Below she discusses acting as her own cinematographer, the influence of Errol Morris’ Interrotron and filming in the “impossible heat” of a refugee camp in Athens. Filmmaker: How and why did you wind up being […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

‘Three Identical Strangers’ Review: Triplets Separated at Birth is a Charming Story Until It Turns Into a Dark Conspiracy — Sundance 2018

The backstory of “Three Identical Strangers” is such obvious movie fodder it’s a wonder it took so long for someone to make a movie about it: In 1980, 19-year-olds Robert Shafran and Edward Galland found each other at the same community college and realized they were twins separated at birth; the ensuing press coverage led them to hear from another 19-year-old, David Kellman, who looked exactly like them. The surprise triplets became fast friends and overnight media sensations. But how did they get pulled apart in the first place?

See More:The 2018 IndieWire Sundance Bible: Every Review, Interview, and News Item Posted During the Festival

Director Tim Wardle’s competent documentary surveys this bizarre phenomenon through the experiences of the men as they entered young adulthood under the most unlikely of circumstances, while the mystery surrounding their infancy deepens as new information comes to light. However, “Three Identical Strangers” doesn’t
See full article at Indiewire »

Dp Noah Greenberg on Chloë Sevigny and Kristen Stewart-Starring Lizzie Borden Drama Lizzie

The 1892 murder of Lizzie Borden’s father and stepmother has inspired numerous books, TV movies and even stage musicals but few feature films. That changes with the arrival of Lizzie from director Craig William Macneill. His film pairs two of the leading actresses of American independent cinema: Chloë Sevigny as Borden and Kristen Stewart as Bridget, her live-in maid and kindred spirit. Lizzie debuts in competition at the 2018 Sundance Film Festival. Prior to its premiere, Filmmaker spoke with cinematographer Noah Greenberg (Most Beautiful Island) about the film’s naturalistic (and claustrophobic) visual palette. Filmmaker: How and why did you wind up being […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

‘Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get Far on Foot’: Why Gus Van Sant Cast Joaquin Phoenix in a Disabled Role — Watch

‘Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get Far on Foot’: Why Gus Van Sant Cast Joaquin Phoenix in a Disabled Role — Watch
Joaquin Phoenix’s casting in “Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get Far on Foot” has proven controversial, given who he’s playing in Gus Van Sant’s film: John Callahan, a quadriplegic cartoonist, musician, and artist. Van Sant addressed the controversy from the IndieWire Studio at the Sundance Film Festival, saying that Callahan himself “wanted the most famous person in the world to play him” and wouldn’t have been bothered by an actor without his own disability taking on the role. Watch below.

Read More:Joaquin Phoenix’s ‘Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get Far on Foot’ Casting Slammed as Offensive by Ruderman Disability Foundation

“This often comes up with all kinds of lead roles — who are the people playing the lead roles, do they have anything in common with the role itself?” Van Sant said. “I definitely would have used a particular person that was quadriplegic if they were the right actor,
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Grace and Frankie’ Review: A Strong and Surprising Season 4 Dares to Face Death — and Gives It the Finger

‘Grace and Frankie’ Review: A Strong and Surprising Season 4 Dares to Face Death — and Gives It the Finger
When does a funny story become sad? Typically in television, this kind of question is framed around arrested development: A grown man is still acting like he’s in college, and certain events force him to look himself in the mirror and say, “Getting that drunk and acting that dumb isn’t funny anymore. It’s sad.”

But what if it’s not arrested development? What if it’s unstoppable regression? Continuing its fearless quest to address the anxieties associated with aging, “Grace and Frankie” dares to ask if its characters’ wild misadventures aren’t actually funny anymore. Maybe they’re scary. Maybe these two best friends are losing control of their minds, bodies, and lives. Maybe they don’t even know it’s happening, as it’s happening. Maybe they need help.

Read More:7 New Netflix Shows to Binge in January 2018, and the Best Episodes of Each

It’s a jarring choice,
See full article at Indiewire »

Octavia Spencer: #MeToo Movement Can’t Devolve Into ‘Women Versus Men’

Octavia Spencer: #MeToo Movement Can’t Devolve Into ‘Women Versus Men’
Oscar-winning actress Octavia Spencer hasn’t shied away from repping the #TimesUp movement throughout this year’s awards season – she appeared on the Golden Globes red carpet wearing all black, alongside her good friend Jessica Chastain – but she’s also eager for the movement to be as prudent and savvy as possible.

As part of Sundance’s conversation section “Power of Story,” Spencer participated in a Friday afternoon panel alongside other creators and thinkers, including actress and “Insecure” creator Issa Rae, tech evangelist Megan Smith, Open Society Foundations president Patrick Gaspard, and Killer Films founder Christine Vachon, for a discussion moderated by Washington Post journalist Sarah Ellison. The theme of the chat was “culture shift,” and sought to discuss the various ways that their work plus “the power of media and the role creative choices play in shifting culture and crystallizing the national conversation.”

Read More:Sundance Questions: Here’s What
See full article at Indiewire »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.